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The Ambivalence of Open Spaces

A place on the web to park the writings, readings, music and musings for Youssef Alaoui Fdili
magictransistor:

Pierre Dénys de Montfort, Collosal Polypus Octopus, c. 1815.

magictransistor:

Pierre Dénys de Montfort, Collosal Polypus Octopus, c. 1815.

(via mudwerks)

historical-nonfiction:

A snowball fight! (circa 1895-1897)

with new fairy photographs

with new fairy photographs

(Source: archive.org)

nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

erikkwakkel:

Whale doodles

This post celebrates the birthday of Herman Melville, author of Moby Dick, who was born on 1 August 1819. When he wrote his book, in 1851, whales were an important commodity, for example for fuelling lamps (an astonishing 300,000 whales were caught between 1835 and 1872 alone). While I am against whaling, there is a fascinating book-historical dynamic to this 19th-century tradition: the captains of whaling vessels kept detailed logbooks, the pages of which are sometimes decorated with charming images. They are doodles, really, entertaining rather than functional. The sample above, taken from digital material made available by the Providence Public Library, shows a pod of inky whales swimming across the page of a daily log (top), a tiny bottle illustrating a post on the consumption of alcohol on board (middle), and a row of whales next to the catch of different vessels (bottom). The images present a peculiar contrast between artistic charm and the bloody events that sparked their creation.

Want to know more about these great little books? Here are some digitized items which you can help to transcribe; here are a whole lot of digitized microfilms of whaling logbooks. Here are PDFs of the famous Nicholson collection of logbooks.

Pics: Providence Public Library, Nicholson collection, log of the Catherine, 1854-1856 (lower pic); Bottle detail from this tweet; Top image from this blog. The library keeps a great blog, here.

viα tenebrumThomas Ingoldsby ‘The Witches Frolic’ (with illustrations by Ernest M. Jessop) ‘The Ingoldsby Legends’ where written by the Clergyman Thomas Barham (1788-1845) under the pseudonym ‘Thomas Ingoldsby’, and originally published piecemeal in Bentleys Miscellany before being collected in book form in the early 1840s.

(via c0untessbathory)

I create entire romances in my dreams.

Fyodor Dostoevsky, White Nights. (via communicants)

(via dostoyevsky)

sullenmoons:

Marta Nael

sullenmoons:

Marta Nael

(via mudwerks)

(Source: ghaas)